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Richard Beaudoin

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Another Woman of Another Kind (2016) 

Seven stories for flute and eight voices on texts by Paul Griffiths

 

BIO

 

Richard Beaudoin is architect of the microtiming technique. Iconic recordings are transcribed in minute detail, treated as palimpsest, forming a parchment over which the composer interweaves original music. Sources include Argerich performing Chopin, Debussy recording Debussy, Thelonious Monk improvising, Gould creaking through Schoenberg, Stevie Wonder singing, and Casals playing Bach. Performances include Nach-Fragen at the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, Vienna Konzerthaus, and Schwetzinger SWR Festspiele, The After-Image at Boston Lyric Opera, and selections from The Artist and his Model at The Forge, London. Taught at Harvard University 2008-2016; currently Visiting Research Fellow in Composition at the Royal Academy of Music, London. www.richardbeaudoin.com 

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PROGRAM NOTES

 

Another woman of another kind (2016)

seven stories for flute and eight voices on texts by Paul Griffiths

Another woman of another kind — a commedia of identity — circles around the line: “It seems I should remember what to say.” This 23-minute, kaleidoscopic song-cycle for Claire Chase and Roomful of Teeth sets seven unpublished poems by Paul Griffiths.

The work is based on a millisecond-level microtiming analysis of Claire’s own performance of Varèse’s Density 21.5 made in February 2016 at Meyer Sound in Berkeley, California. The duration of each sound event — Claire’s every pitch, click, surge, and breath — was measured, transcribed into notation, and used as material.

The title — a line from Griffiths’ closing sonnet — hints that there are (at least) two Claires involved in the piece: The MeyerSoundClaire that is transcribed into the notation, and the LiveOnstageClaire who (with Teeth) weaves new music atop, inside, behind and under the microtimed transcription. Finally, the durations of the movements follow a curve — each is longer that the one before.

© 2016 Richard Beaudoin

SCORE INFO