Olga Neuwirth

Magic Flu-idity (2018) for flute and typewriter
Nathan Davis, typewriter

 
1
1

2
2

5
5

1
1

1/5

BIO

 

Olga Neuwirth was born in Graz, Austria, in 1968. She studied at the Academy of Music in Vienna and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. During her stay in the States she also attended an art college, where she studied painting and film. She first burst onto the international scene in 1991, at the age of 22, when two of her mini-operas were performed at the Wiener Festwochen. Ever since her works have been presented worldwide. With Nobel Prize winning novelist Elfriede Jelinek she has created two radio plays and three operas. Her opera Lost Highway, based on the film by David Lynch, premiered in 2003 and won a South Bank Show Award for the production presented by English National Opera at the Young Vic in 2008. Beside several concerts for her 50th anniversary in 2018, Lost Highway and The Outcast can be seen in new productions. Lost Highway under the direction of Yuval Sharon and The Outcast under Netia Jones. Her new opera Orlando will be premiered at the Wiener Staatsoper in 2019.

JV7311_edited.jpg

PROGRAM NOTES

 

Magic Flu-idity (2018) for flute and typewriter

Olga Neuwirth’s “Magic Flu-idity” is a reduction of her recent flute concerto “Aello - ballet mécanomorphe” which she wrote for Claire Chase and the Swedish Chamber Orchestra in 2018 as a companion piece to Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 4. In the flute concerto version, scored for solo-flute, two muted trumpets, string ensemble, keyboard and typewriter, “Aello” alludes to one the harpies of classical mythology, “someone sent by the gods to restore peace, if necessary with force, and to exact punishment for crimes.”  Mark Berry of Seen And Heard International described it this way: “In three movements, like its companion, it immediately spoke with the tones – in every sense – of a serious composer at work. Figures remembered from Bach, whether melodic, rhythmic, or both, sounded as if trapped in a machine. Or were they actually perfectly happy to be there? Claire Chase on flute, shadowed by two muted trumpets, offered breathtaking virtuosity, set against an ever-changing ensemble that included synthesised harpsichord and glass harmonica as well as portable typewriter. Machines can be fun as well as serious – indeed sometimes especially when they are serious. So too can Bach.”

In this new duo version, both the solo flute and the typewriter absorb lines of the original concerto, conjuring the spirit of Aello - at times capricious, at others demonic - with orchestral force.

SCORE INFO

 
COMING SOON